Origins of Horse Phrases

“Feeling Your Oats”

Feeling one’s oats describes someone who is energized, enthusiastic even assertive. The phrase was originally used to describe a horse’s [...]

“One Horse Town”

The original 18th century standard English use of one-horse meant 'drawn or worked, by a single horse'. By the mid-19th [...]

“HAYDAY”

HAYDAY has nothing to do with the dried grass our horses love to eat. In fact, HAYDAY is a misspelling [...]

“Extreme Vetting”

The noun “vet” originated became an abbreviation for “veterinarian”. By 1850 in Great Britain and Ireland, horse doctors were commonly [...]

“Dead Ringer”

Over the centuries, the sport of kings has spawned its share of horse slang including DEAD RINGER. The phrase originated [...]

“Hold Your Horses”

The phrase is American first appearing in print in 1844. “Oh, hold your hosses, Squire. There’s no use getting’ riled, [...]