“Feeling Your Oats”

February 9th, 2019|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management|Tags: |

Feeling one’s oats describes someone who is energized, enthusiastic even assertive. The phrase was originally used to describe a horse’s energetic behavior after being fed oats. The origins of the phrase are unknown but are found in English literature by the mid 1500’s. “That wilfull and vnruly age, which lacketh rypenes and discretion, and (as wee [...]

“One Horse Town”

June 12th, 2018|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management, Series|Tags: |

The original 18th century standard English use of one-horse meant 'drawn or worked, by a single horse'. By the mid-19th century it had gained wider, metaphorical use. “ ’One horse' is an agricultural phrase, applied to anything small or insignificant, or to any inconsiderable or contemptible person: as a 'one-horse town,' a 'one- horse bank,' a [...]

“HAYDAY”

April 25th, 2018|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management, Series|Tags: |

HAYDAY has nothing to do with the dried grass our horses love to eat. In fact, HAYDAY is a misspelling of the word HEYDAY. Please don’t fret if you have mistakenly used HAYDAY, it’s a common error with an impressive history - we’ve been misspelling it for over 200 years HEYDAY first appeared in 16th century [...]

“Extreme Vetting”

March 28th, 2018|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management, Series|Tags: |

The noun “vet” originated became an abbreviation for “veterinarian”. By 1850 in Great Britain and Ireland, horse doctors were commonly called “vets”. By 1875, “vet” became a verb at the racetrack as in “the racehorse had only to be ‘vetted’”. The “vetting” of horse progressed to was applied to people, a humorous way to describe a [...]

“Dead Ringer”

February 22nd, 2018|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management, Series|Tags: |

Over the centuries, the sport of kings has spawned its share of horse slang including DEAD RINGER. The phrase originated in the U.S. during the late 19th century meaning a dishonest substitution of a better horse in a race in an effort to dupe the bookies. The substitute needed to look like the less talented horse [...]

“Hold Your Horses”

February 2nd, 2018|Categories: Fun, Horse Phrases, Management, Series|Tags: , |

The phrase is American first appearing in print in 1844. “Oh, hold your hosses, Squire. There’s no use getting’ riled, no how.” - The Picayune (New Orleans) newspaper September 1844. A century late, the phrase got a second wind in the rural south after WWII. Steam engine tractors were becoming an affordable option to plowing by [...]